Project name: Combating Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CCSEC) in Bangladesh

Duration: January 2016 to June 2019

Name of Donor: The European Union

The project is a consortium initiative led by Terre des Hommes-Netherlands and implemented by Social and Economic Enhancement Programme – SEEP, Society for Social Services (SSS), and Breaking the Silence (BTS).
Brief description of project:
Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children comprises sexual abuse and exploitation by adult and child for remuneration in cash or in kind to the child or a third person or persons. It is a process through which “the child is treated as a sexual object and as a commercial object” and “which constitutes a form of coercion and violence against children, and amounts to forced labor and a contemporary form of slavery”. There are three primary and interrelated forms of commercial sexual exploitation of children: prostitution, pornography and trafficking.

No reliable information and statistics of the actual CSEC issues and incidents are available, anecdotal evidence suggests that sexual abuse and exploitation of girls is common in Bangladesh. Children, girls in particular, are vulnerable from a very young age. Since reliable quantitative data on the extent of sexual abuse and exploitation is very limited, so making protection to child is very difficult to enforce. A ‘culture of silence’ surrounding this issue forces victimized children into isolation and prevents them from accessing legal or social justice. In this way, a sexually abused girl in Bangladesh is abused twice: first by the perpetrator physically, and second by society both psychologically and socially.

Combating Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CCSEC) project is a forty-two months consortium initiative of Terre des Hommes Netherlands, which was set off on January 1, 2016 and will be closed on June 30, 2019 funded by the European Union. CCSEC action aims to combat commercial sexual exploitation of children in Bangladesh and the specific objective of CCSEC is to protect and promote the rights of survivors and at risk children of CSEC through facilitating implementation of ILO Convention 182 and UNCRC Optional Protocol 2 in Bangladesh. With technical support of Terre des Hommes Netherlands Bangladesh, the project has been partnered with Social and Economic Enhancement Programme (SEEP), Society for Social Services (SSS) and Breaking the Silence (BTS) for running the project at Dhaka North City Corporation and Tangail Sadar Upazilla, Tangail district. Of those partners, SEEP serves the Secretariat role to implement CCSEC and set up two Drop in- Centers for children exposed to commercial sexual exploitation and at risk children as well as work to rebuild their life in society. Breaking the Silence (BTS) provides psychosocial support to the survivor children exposed to CSEC and at risk. Moreover, Society for Social Services (SSS) runs a full-fledged shelter home for the rescued children and works for their dignified lives by providing them a comprehensive holistic care.

Working area
•-> Dhaka North City Corporation- Ward no. 9, 10, 11
•-> Kandapara Brothel, Tangail Pouroshava, Tangail


Expected results of project:
Overall objective:
To contribute to the elimination of commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) in Bangladesh.

Specific Objective:
To protect and promote the rights of survivors and at risk children of CSEC through facilitating implementation of ILO Convention 182 (ILO-C182) and UNCRC Optional Protocol two (UNCRC-OP-2) in Bangladesh.

Result #1:
1,000 survivors & at risk children of CSEC have been rescued, removed and withdrawn from commercial sexual exploitation or similar practices and to guarantee their rights by applying holistic, integral care.

Result #2:
Survivors & at risk children of CSEC influence policy & implementation of ILO-C182 and UNCRC-OP-2 in Bangladesh through engaging civil society & media.


Achievement so far (Up to June 2017):
•-> In order to protect and promote the rights of the survivors and at risk children against the target of 1000 in 42 months, during the first year 369 children at risk and survivors have been identified, registered and provided with necessary supports through one shelter home in Tangail and two drop in centers in Mirpur areas.
•-> In Tangail at local level a Child Protection Monitoring Committee (CPMC) has been pro-active on CSEC (commercial sexual exploitation of children) issues with 26 members and duty bearers among CSO representatives, politicians, advocates, doctors, teachers and human rights activists and media. At national level in Mirpur, two engagement workshops were organized with 22 service providers and relevant CSOs who committed to support the target children.
•-> Four CSO networks such as Street Children Activists Network (SCAN), Sex Workers Network of Bangladesh (SWNOB), National Girl Child Advocacy Forum (NGCAF), and Bangladesh Shishu Adhikar Forum (BSAF) actively participated in the discussion meetings demanding the rights of these children. Four Child Led Organizations (CLO) have been formed and meetings were organized with the service providers, CSOs and CLOs where the members of the parliament were present and committed support to these children. The awareness raising among the citizens at local level and national level in the project areas have been quite successful and this will be strengthened further during the remaining time of the project period.
•-> Baseline with 1826 children has been conducted, crosschecked in the field level and a report has been submitted. •-> Most of the children at risk and survivors of commercial sexual exploitation found traumatized as they confront the most horrible situation in the street. Psycho-social counseling is very important to reveal the at risk and survivor children from trauma to run a normal life. Psycho-social counseling sessions are provided to the DiC children in Dhaka and SBCH in Tangail in every month. The project developed psychology test and counseling tools for the children which are being used for assessment and counseling. During the reporting period 107 (67 from DiCs, 40 from SBCH) children received psychosocial counseling.